Godaddy Hosting Fails Hard on Every Metric

Disclaimer: Article contents derived and heavily influenced by multiple tech experts and web developers (linked below) who post of their own experiences. 

A testament to the power of “shock and awe advertising,” GoDaddy has risen to become THE top of mind website / hosting company when someone starts looking to create a site. This may have a few million things to do with the number of Super Bowl commercials they have bought, and/or the use of sexy girls in car racing jackets (let’s face it: sex sells!)

However, using a company because it employs the most flash isn’t always the best idea; that’s like choosing your car mechanic based on how many hot-pink wacky-wavy-inflatable-worm-guys gyrating outside their shop. In other words, flare and glitter doesn’t equate to quality!

As you may or may not be surprised to learn, GoDaddy has the number one worst reputation in the industry. Its cheap prices and gimmicks such as a free domain name with $6/mo hosting may seem quite appealing; yet, as the saying goes: “you always get what you pay for.”

But don’t take our word for it (we are obviously biased). Instead read from the multiple independent sources — from Tech Experts, Developers, Normal Users and Consultants — we have linked to.

For each metric you want to use to evaluate a web hosting company, Godaddy falls flat and scores abysmally bad. This is why we mince no words and say unabashedly: GoDaddy web hosting sucks. Sorry for being crude, but it’s the truth. Read below as to why:

The Areas GoDaddy Falls Down:

  • User Experience is Pitiful

    GoDaddy’s own user forum showcases example after example of user complaints.

  • Poor Performance, Slow Speeds, and a TON of Downtime

    Perhaps you understand that paying a low cost comes with low quality. And you may be fine with that. But just know that in the web hosting space, low quality means a spinning wheel when customers try to boot up your site. It means sluggish performance, “white pages of death” and 508 errors. It means restrictive controls and services. It means experienced developers REFUSING to build your site if you use Godaddy. It means people clicking away from your site and checking out other options instead of learning more about you and your organization.

  • GoDaddy is a Technical Nightmare

    If you are an experienced developer then you already know the horrors of trying to use Godaddy’s platform. They don’t do things in a way that makes sense. This means that even simple tasks can take hours. And for clients, this means racking up a large bill of support hours for even minor changes or enhancements. So that “cheap” hosting really isn’t so cheap in the end.

    Read a far more detailed technical account of the horrors of using Godaddy from the WordPress Development company iThemes. They were so frustrated with the over-the-top negative experiences with Godaddy they give a play-by-play of the hell they have gone through in an attempt to prevent the same from happening to others!

  • GoDaddy has Used Sexist and Misogynistic Ads for Years

    If their service, lack of support, poor products, and performance doesn’t bother you enough to consider other options then consider the fact that their entire empire is largely built on a history of misogyny and classic sexism. A good company should leverage its merits and quality to be the foundation of its social and corporate mission statement; Godaddy’s foundation is as vapid and flimsy as they come.

    And all this is to say nothing of the fact their former CEO is an elephant-killing monster.

  • Everyone Who Uses Godaddy Seems to Hate Them

    Just ask a few of your friends or colleagues for their experiences. In fact, there is an entire “Anti Godaddy Movement” on the internet found at http://antigodaddy.com; if you have a few hours to blow, read through some of the hilariously sad experiences and hate-fueled savagery there. 🙂

Godaddy Hosting seems to be the “Comcast of web hosting” – people use them (regrettably) and hate every second of it. Examples:


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About The Author:

Sean is the principal at Loud Canvas Media. He enjoys technology and using it to solve marketing and business challenges. Sean works directly with the development team to manage the implementation of new features and functionality, while also overseeing day-to-day operations and business planning. He also interfaces daily with clients.